Get Your 670 On - Main Board

Good morning! Today we are going to discuss the population of the main board of the 670. This baby is pretty straight forward, populate as labeled. You know I'm not just gonna leave you hanging on that... obviously I am still going to walk you through this, guys.

The component values are on each PCB footprint, resistors will have an "R", and the capacitors will have an "C" attached to the footprint designator, eg: R22 is a resistor, and C22 is a capacitor (mind you, I pulled those numbers out of nowhere, so don't go looking for those exact examples). 

Install these puppies according to their values. When you get to footprints that say JUMP, a jump wire needs to be installed. There are a few different sizes you will need, mainly violet jump wires (.7), and brown jump wires (1"). You will notice there are some places that are unpopulated, that say MONO... leave these blank. Unless of course you want to jump them, and by doing so, lock the unit in mono... which you don't, right? Right.

As you guys know, I LOVE, LOVE, LOVE to utilize tape in my population procedures. This helps keep everything in place, squared up, and nice and flat to the board for soldering. You should do what I do... at least when it comes to utilizing tape.

As you guys know, I LOVE, LOVE, LOVE to utilize tape in my population procedures. This helps keep everything in place, squared up, and nice and flat to the board for soldering. You should do what I do... at least when it comes to utilizing tape.

For me, a systematic approach is the only way to go, especially with this board. There are a shit ton (an actual measurement, I'm positive) of parts and components with the 670, and being organized will save you a headache later on. I separate all the resistors from the caps and sockets, keeping the resistors in their original lil' bags, and start the process of installing them, bag, by bag. I like to stick with one value, until that value has been fully populated, but there are times that staring at the board trying to find that one 150k footprint is enough to make you wanna go blind, so skip that guy, and save your sanity... this is supposed to be fun, remember.

I tend to do resistors first, simply because you can populate almost the entire board before you flip it over to start soldering, and efficiency is something that makes this methodical gal happy. Once I complete those, I like to start working on the sockets because they are sturdier than the capacitors when it comes to flipping the board over to solder. This is one of those places that tape plays the part of the sidekick you never knew you needed, until now. 

Those sockets can be tricky lil' suckers- doing what they want, even after you took the time to show them how you need them to behave. Why waste time, and cause yourself frustration when you can just tape them into place?! I mean, sometimes we all like to do things the hard way, and I get it, but when this is supposed to fun, and almost zen-like, why f*ck with it? Tape. Tape. Tape. Much like the resistors, you can populate all of the sockets at one time, and solder those right into place, one right after the other... if you use tape. Don't skimp on the tape. Get your happy lil' taping on, making sure they are all laying flat, and even. No one likes a caddywhompis socket. Do one at a time, ensuring they are perfect, and that the pins/flaps are folded over- I use the end of my pliers for this, the soft nubs grip the metal, and if you slip while folding them, you don't have to worry about scratching the board.

She is a beauty, isn't she?! GAH.... (heart eyes emoji, heart eyes emoji, heart eyes emoji)

She is a beauty, isn't she?! GAH.... (heart eyes emoji, heart eyes emoji, heart eyes emoji)

Leaving the Orange Drops till last is probably best, as they are sensitive. Doing them last allows for you to flip the board to solder other parts without bending them. Below you will find some pictures that show the best way to prepare them for installation. If the leads from the Orange Drop to the board are long, you are gonna want to shrink tube them to provide insulation, and protection of the board.

Last but not least, the audio transformers... install those puppies. Don't worry about wiring anything right now, we aren't there yet. Install according to the footprints and designators on the front of the PCB, and the  color codes on the bottom of the PCB indicate where to install the transformer wires. 

That concludes our main board blog. Hahaha. Until next week, I hope ya'll have a kick ass weekend, and if you are building, that you are doing so with a big ole grin!

gregory lomayesva